Celebrating the Lincoln Theatre

May 27th, 2010 by Rolanda Copley

By Rolanda Copley, CAPA Publicist

It’s hard to believe it’s already been a year since the Lincoln Theatre reopened. But here we are, one year later, and all three floors of the Lincoln are going strong. That is something Columbus can be proud of.

The Lincoln is unlike any other theatre CAPA owns or manages, and in fact, is a rarity in this country. The Egyptian Revival-style décor the Lincoln wears so beautifully became very popular in the late 1920s after the discovery of King Tut’s tomb fascinated the world. Sadly, today there are very few Egyptian Revival-style theatres left.

Secondly, the Lincoln Theatre is multi-functional in that all three floors can operate independently and simultaneously on any given day. No other theatre in Columbus has as much versatility, let alone modern amenities. She is truly a marriage between history and technology.

Come and see for yourself how truly special the Lincoln Theatre is as we celebrate the one year anniversary of her renovation and reopening. On Monday, May 31, the Lincoln (769 E. Long St.) will hold an open house from 12-4 pm. Take a free, self-guided tour and enjoy a short video in the main theatre about the renovation of this historic gem.

Several of the Lincoln’s resident arts groups will be in the second-floor Cardinal Health Ballroom with literature and information about upcoming classes and programs, and The Jazz Arts Group’s Jazz Academy will also be offering tours of its top-floor facilities and have information available about upcoming classes and programs.

At 1 pm, there will be an induction ceremony in front of the theatre under the marquee to debut the first name on its Walk of Fame, awarded to Columbus native and award-winning author and journalist Wil Haygood, followed by the cutting of the Lincoln Theatre’s first birthday cake by Mayor Michael B. Coleman.

It will be a day to remember!

A Look Back at the 2010 CAPA Gala

May 21st, 2010 by admin

by Dustin Grovemiller, Donor Relations Manager

One of my responsibilities here at CAPA is the planning and coordination of the annual CAPA Gala. The Gala is really the only major fundraising event that CAPA holds on an annual basis. As you can imagine, if you’re only doing one big shindig a year, it’s really got to be something. Thankfully, I work with many individuals who have really great ideas and are dedicated to making this a great event. Our Gala chairs, planning committee, and fellow staffers really stepped up to pull off a fantastic evening in support of CAPA, which raised about $135,000.

A Look at the CAPA GalaThis year’s Gala was held on Friday, April 30, at the Southern Theatre and the Grand Ballroom at the adjoining Westin Columbus. We always hold the Gala at one of our theatres (it’s been at the Ohio for the last two years and at the Palace in 2007), but this was the one I had been waiting for. The Southern is my favorite of the CAPA theatres, not to mention that it’s a jaw-droppingly beautiful space and it’s in the same building as an equally beautiful hotel.

The evening’s “Broadway Bound” theme highlighted CAPA’s new partnership with Broadway Across America, and we tried to add a lot of “awards ceremony” flair to the event. When guests arrived, they walked the red carpet and mingled on the Southern’s stage to enjoy a cocktail or two. The program for the evening showcased the upcoming Broadway season and featured singer Sarah Hiance and pianist Nathan Laing performing songs from those shows. The Gala patrons then moved to the Westin for a fabulous dinner (the entree was Mongolian Marinated Petite Fillet with Five-Spiced Salmon. We can’t say enough about the excellent work done by the Westin’s chef and staff), with yet more music by another talented local musician, pianist and singer Matt Munhall. Following dinner, our guests returned to the Southern for dessert and dancing on the stage, getting to cut loose to classic tunes covered by the Bill Foley Band.

By all accounts, it was a much enjoyed event. You can see for yourself at the web site of our photographers for the evening, Ben Simon and Emily Scott: http://www.bensimonstudio.com/.

A Look at the CAPA GalaThe best part of this year’s Gala, however, wasn’t that we raised money, promoted CAPA, or even just threw a great party. We had the pleasure of honoring two individuals who have made significant contributions both to CAPA and to our community–Barbara and Dr. Ralph Lach. We got to hear from family and friends about the remarkable impact that the Lachs have made. To show our gratitude for their commitment and many years of service (Barbara has been on the CAPA Board since 1980), CAPA is officially renaming the Ohio Theatre Ticket Office in their honor. As our central ticket office, it’s one of the places at CAPA that, like the Lachs, truly touches all of our theatres.

Thanks again to everyone who helped make the 2010 CAPA Gala a success.

Behind the Scenes at the Summer Movie Series

May 13th, 2010 by Rich Corsi

By Rich Corsi, Director of Programming

It’s hard to believe this is the 40th CAPA Summer Movie Series, presented by PNC. After being involved in one form or another for the past 19 years, I know it takes a lot of work and a lot of people to put it together, and I am proud to be a part of it.

We usually start looking at the movie lineup in December. Lance Carwile, consultant for the CAPA Summer Movie Series, operates as a liaison between CAPA and the big movie companies like SONY Pictures, Warner Brothers, Criterion, etc., and will contact the movie companies, book the films, and send the contracts to CAPA. Let’s just say, without Lance, this would be a much more difficult process.

Assigning dates to the films is the most complicated and time-consuming part of the process. Many 35mm prints may not be available on the dates we request, so we shuffle things around until the entire puzzle fits together.

There are two things about the Series that still amaze me even after so many years. First is the fact that after 40 years, we are still able to present “series premieres.” You would think we would have shown every movie ever made by now!

Secondly, watching the crowds arrive and seeing their excitement is still an awesome feeling. In talking to folks over the years, it seems an evening at the Summer Movie Series is much more than just attending a movie. It is an event. It’s being greeted at the front door by the CAPA ushers, listening to the magnificent “Mighty Morton” theatre organ prior to the show, and escaping reality for a little while to enjoy a great film you wouldn’t otherwise be able see on the big screen. It’s the experience the architect of the theatre wanted you to have since opening the doors of this movie show palace in 1928.

I’m really looking forward to seeing the thousands of folks coming through the doors of the Ohio Theatre for the Summer Movie Series again. Some may be attending for the first time, and some may have been here so many times, they could give a tour of the theatre themselves! Whether it’s a date night or a treat for the children or grandchildren, you just have to love the Summer Movie Series.

See you at the Ohio!

A Moment with Pilobolus

May 5th, 2010 by CAPASMM

by Joe Cortez, Web & Social Media Coordinator

When you see Pilobolus on our website, you may immediately think that it is nothing more than modern dance. What you probably don’t know about them, however, is that Pilobolus is more than dance. For instance, did you know that Pilobolus has produced short films for the past two seasons of NFL broadcasts? Or that they have performed in more than 64 countries around the world, including a performance for the Queen of England? And in addition, Pilobolus has made numerous television appearances, including CBS’ 60 Minutes, The Late Show with Conan O’Brien, Oprah, and have won an Emmy for their work in television? Sure, modern dance may be one aspect of Pilobolus’ work – but they span so much more than just what you’ll see at the Palace Theatre on Thursday night.

This week, I had the opportunity to catch up with some of the dancers of Pilobolus, and ask them about their motivations. Read from them how they got started, and their favorite performance pieces that you will see here in Columbus!

Q: When and why did you begin dancing?

Nile Russel, dancer: I began dancing when I was about 5 yrs old.  My mom put me into tap lessons after school with Ms. Jackie Flynn.  I went every day after school. I loved being able to move, feel rhythms, and bounce my body against the music, but it sucked being the only guy in class.  It wasn’t until high school and, more so, in college that dance became my passion, however, I think tap and Ms. Flynn have influenced my  approach to dance.

Erika Jimbo, dancer: I began dancing with my sister when I was about 5 years old.  My mother enrolled us both in a ballet program because she always wanted to learn when she was younger, but was never given the chance.  She thought it would be fun for us.

Chris Whitney, dancer: I started my formal dance training the summer following my senior year of high school.  Since the age of 11 I had been involved in theatre productions, musicals, Shakespeare, et cetera.  It was during a high school production in Cleveland that I met Bill Wade, then Director/Founder of the Y.A.R.D. (Youth At Risk Dancing) at Cleveland School for the Arts.  I spent the first six weeks of my summer taking classes at a summer intensive run by Mr. Wade and from then on was hooked.

Matt Del Rosario, dancer: It all started when I was attending the University of Hawaii.  I began as an inspired education major, but before long I started skipping class to surf.  My “Oh, I’ll go tomorrow” attitude led to me failing multiple classes.  So, I decided to take a dance class to boost my GPA.  I signed up for beginning ballet with Paul Maley, who happened to be an alumnus of North Carolina School of the Arts.  It was the hardest thing in the world, but I really enjoyed it and didn’t give up.  Paul got me in contact with NCSA and that year the dean of NCSA’s dance department flew to Hawaii to audition me at home.  After the audition she invited me to come to the school, and that’s how I got started.

Q: What’s your favorite piece to perform?

Annika Sheaff, dancer: “Rushes”, from 2007, is a piece that I was lucky enough to help create.  We collaborated on it with the Israeli choreographers Inbal Pinto and Avshalom Pollack, who I think are genius artists.  I was able to help create a world, and a  character within that world, that over the past three years I have become attached to.  I learn more and more about the character each time I perform the dance.  It is amazing to feel that even though I have performed Rushes hundreds of times, every performance is still new for me, and I can always dig deeper into it.

Matt Del Rosario: My favorite piece to perform would have to be “Gnomen.”  There is a sense of brotherhood and compassion that I really respect about this piece.

Our thanks goes to the dancers of Pilobolus for taking the time to talk to me about their experiences!

Its not too late to get tickets to see Pilobolus in concert! Use the password “DANCER” and you can get 50% off tickets! To order tickets, call 614-469-0939, visit the CAPA Ticket Office at the Ohio Theatre or the Palace Theatre Ticket Office 2 hours before the show begins, or click here to order from Ticketmaster!

And for all of our Facebook fans: we’ve got a special photo gallery up on Facebook right now! Click here to check it out!